Archived Events


Mozart, Nyman, Karmanov
Running time:
2 parts, 60 minutes each
6+
Рrogramme

Mozart, Concert symphony for string sextet (KV 320d)

Fantasy c-moll KV 396 (completed by Maximilian Shtadler)

Michael Nyman, String Quartet №2

Pavel Karmanov

“Gollandiya” (“Holland”) for soprano, piano quintet, and tape. Russian premiere.

“Shumaniana” (“A Tribute to Schumann”) for solo piano. World premiere.

“I made my home” for string sextet, prepared piano, and tapes. Russian premiere.

The program is subject to change

26 November 2018 Monday 19.00 Grand Hall
19.00 Grand Hall

Mozart, Nyman, Karmanov

Soloists:
Alexey Lyubimov, piano
Marina Katarzhnova, violin
Asya Sorshneva, violin
Sergey Poltavsky, viola
Dmitriy Ousov, viola
Pyotr Kondrashin, cello
Olga Dyomina, cello
Leonid Bakoulin, double bass
Yekaterina Kitchigina, soprano

A night of three premieres – it’s extraordinary! It’s not every day we listen to the first performance of a composer’s oevre, and when we do we become a part of creation of new sound reality. This is why since the beginning of time concerts like that not only gather musicic professionals, but music aficionados too.

November 26 will see brand new works of Pavel Karmanov, the Russia-and world-wide renowned composer. As early as in his student years in Moscow Conservatory he felt that avant-garde composition is not his cup of tea, and he turned to minimalism. Now his compositions are far beyond such musicologists clichées as “mimimalism”, or “post-minimalism”. Karmanov uses different styles or technics to express his soul. All these three new pieces are dedicated to pianist Alexey Lyubimov, the outstanding advocate and supporter of contemporary music.

Englishman Michael Nyman is one of Karmanov’s hero. And Nyman in his own turn, can be dubbed as “Mozart’s heir”, for he would use Mozarts’ themes in his compositions. This is why Lyubimov, the headliner of the concert, includes in his set Fantasy c-moll KV 396, the unfinished work, completed by Maximilian Shtadler. “You can feel Mozart’s genius even in tiniest bit of music!”, assures Lyubimov.